Undergraduate

Courses

Classification Subject No. Subject Name

Lecture:Lab.:

Credit

(Homework)

Semester Remark
Basic Course MS211 Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering 3:0:3(3) Spring, Fall  
Major (Mandatory) MS212 Thermodynamics of Materials 3:0:3(3) Spring  
MS213 Crystallography and Diffraction 3:0:3(3) Fall  
MS310 Quantum Chemistry for Materials Scientists 3:0:3(3) Fall  
MS311 Phase Transformation and Microstructure Evolution 3:0:3(3) Spring  
MS321 Advanced Materials Lab Ⅰ 3:0:3(3) Spring  
MS322 Advanced Materials Lab Ⅱ 3:0:3(3) Fall  
Major (Elective) MS214 Application of Thermodynamics to Materials Science and Engineering 3:0:3(3) Fall  
MS215 Mechanical Behavior of Materials 3:0:3(3) Fall  
MS216 Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Materials 3:0:3(3) Spring  
MS331 Nanomaterials Science & Technology 3:0:3(3) Spring  
MS340 Polymer Materials 3:0:3(3) Fall  
MS354 Electrochemistry of Materials Science 3:0:3(3) Fall  
MS360 Mechanics of Materials 3:0:3(3) Spring  
MS371 Structure and Properties of Engineering Alloys 3:0:3(3) Spring  
MS381 Introduction to Solid State Physics 3:0:3(3) Fall  
MS412 Material Design and Manufacturing Process 3:0:3(3) Spring

MS414 Materials Characterization 3:0:3(3) Fall

MS415 Introduction to Semiconductor Devices 3:0:3(3) Spring

MS421 Introduction to Ceramics 3:0:3(3) Spring

MS424 Circuits and Electronics for Materials Science and Engineering 3:0:3(3) Fall

MS425 Introduction to Biomaterials 3:0:3(3) Spring

MS431 Nano-Biomaterials 3:0:3(3) Fall

MS441 Introduction to Display Materials 3:0:3(3) Fall

MS481 Semiconductor Processing 3:0:3(3) Fall

MS482 Special Topics in Materials Science and Engineering 3:0:3(3) Spring, Fall

Research MS490 Research in Materials Science and Engineering 0:6:3(3)    
MS495 Individual Study 0:6:1(3)    
MS496 Seminar 1:0:1(3)    
◎: Courses mutually recognized by undergraduate and graduate programs

Descriptions of Courses

  • MS211 Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

    This course covers atomic bonding, crystal structures, crystal defects, diffusion, phase diagrams and microstructures, mechanical and electromagnetic properties of metals, ceramics, semiconductors and polymers.

  • MS212 Thermodynamics of Materials

    This course introduces the essential features of zeroth, first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics and their application to materials, statistical interpretation of entropy, and experimental techniques used to measure thermodynamic functions. Furthermore, this course deals with surface phenomena and considers their application not only to hydrostatic system, but also to magnetic, dielectric, piezoelectric and mechanical systems.

  • MS311 Phase Transformation and Microstructure Evolution

    The objective of this course is to provide juniors in MS&E with the concepts and models which are required to understand the formation and evolution of microstructures in both the crystalline solids and thin films. The topics include: thermodynamics of solid solutions, phase equlibria, diffusion equations and solution, interdiffusion, surface diffusion, surface energies and thin film formation, interface structures and energies, interface energies and equilibrium shapes, grain growth and recrystallization, solidification and crystal growth; homogeneous and inhomogeneous nucleation in solids, growth and overall transformations kinetics, spinodal decomposition and coarsening, massive transformations, ordering transformations, martensitic transformations, transformation kinetics in thin films, surface kinetics processes, grain formation and evolution, thin film stresses, epitaxial growth, solid phase amorphization and crystallization, and thin film reactions.

  • MS321 Advanced Materials Lab I

    This course is organized to give the basic theories and concepts through the introductory experiments about the phase diagrams and material characteristics. Tensile test for mechanical properties, electrical transport phenomena for electrical properties are included. Safety, technical writing, experimental design and error analysis are also introduced.

  • MS322 Advanced Materials Lab II

    This course introduces how to tailor the properties and performance of materials by modifications in compositions and microstructures through synthesis and processing. Also, general microfabrication technologies, in which photo-lithography, diffusion of dopant, Si oxidation, and thin film deposition are included, are introduced on the basis of term projects.

  • MS213 Crystallography and Diffraction

    This course deals with chemical bonds, atomic packing as a consequence of bond type, crystal structures by atomic packing, lattice and symmetry in crystals, reciprocal lattice and Ewald sphere. Principles and applications of optical, X-ray, and electron diffraction to crystal structure characterization, laboratory for basic techniques of optical, X-ray, and electron diffraction are covered.

  • MS214 Applications of Thermodynamics to Materials Science and Engineering

    This subject aims to establish an in-depth understanding of the chemical phenomena occurring at the materials exposed to the high temperature, which provides a capability to design a new materials and an optimum high temperature material-process. Especially, the knowledge obtained in this course can help to predict the equilibrium phase and composition of materials at a given state.

  • MS215 Mechanical Behavior of Materials

    This course introduces to sophomores the concept of dislocations and to understand the role of dislocations on mechanical properties of materials. Topics include: application of principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics to brittle fracture and to fatigue crack propagation and reviews elasticity theory, elements of plasticity, and strengthening mechanisms.

  • MS216 Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Materials

    This course will offer the opportunities to understand the electrical and magnetic properties of various materials such as metals, semiconductors, and insluators, This purpose of this course is to understand electron's behavior in solid, band structures of materials, general properties of semiconductours and their devices, and oricin of magneitc properties.

  • MS310 Quantum Chemistry for Materials Scientists

    Understanding quantum chemistry is a necessity for materials scientists. This course covers wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, the hydrogen model, molecular orbitals, symmetry of molecules, spectroscopy, and basic principle of characerization of solid materials.

  • MS331 Nanomaterials Science & Technology

    This course covers the techniques for patterning materials at the nanometer length scale. Topics include: nanostructure, self-assembly, nanoimprint lithography, scanning probe lithography, organic semiconductors, nanopatterning, atomic layer deposition, nanoelectronics, colloidal crystals, mesostructures, circuits and programmable assembling DNA.

  • MS340 Polymer Materials

    The course is to collect and organize understanding of the relationships between structure, properties and applications of polymer materials. The major polymer properties such as processability, mechanical, thermal, electrical, optical, acoustic, chemical and surface properties will be discussed from various aspects of polymer structures.

  • MS354 Corrosion and Oxidation of Metals

    This course is designed to provide undergraduate students in materials science and engineering an introduction to degradation of metals and alloys at both low and high temperatures. The fundamentals of electrochemistry and electrode kinetics pertinent to metallic corrosion, corrosion control, gas-metal reactions, and mechanisms and kinetics of oxidation are presented. Topics include: Introduction to corrosion and oxidation, review on electrochemistry, pourbaix diagrams, corrosion kinetics, mixed potential theory, passivity, predicting corrosion behavior, corrosion rate measurements, galvanic corrosion, localized corrosion, stress, corrosion, hydrogen damages, corrosion prevention, mechanisms and kinetics of oxidation, alloy oxidation, other metal gas reactions. Prerequisites : MS214 and MS215

  • MS360 Mechanics of Materials

    Basic topics of mechanics of materials are covered including: concept of stress and strain, axial loading, torsion, bending and shear. Stress and strain transformation, bending of beam and shaft, combined loading will be included. Some of current development in mechanics of materials are also discussed.

  • MS371 Structure and Properties of Engineering Alloys

    This course presents the relationship between phase transformations, microstructures and the mechanical properties of metals and alloys. Applications to alloy design, processing, and heat-treatment are included. A consideration is made of mostly mechanical properties, structural stability, grain size, interstitial and subsitutional solutes, precipitates and second-phase particles.

  • MS381 Introduction to Solid State Physics

    This course teaches all the physical phenomena in solids from the point of wave concepts. It covers the lattice vibrations, electromagnetic waves, and electron waves. The importance interaction between those waves are emphasized. The wave theories are applied to explain the solid-state phenomena such as specific heat, thermal conduction, electron transport and scattering, light scattering, light transmission and reflection, and ionic polarization.

  • MS412 Material Design and Manufacturing Process

    This subject is intended to provide senior engineering students, who are interested in the materials science and engineering, with a general and practical understanding of the materials design and manufacturing process. This course deals with the topics of decision making, optimization, availability, planning, statistical approach, reliability and quality control. To understand these topics, the students are asked to practice design and manufacturing a specific system. Also, since computers are becoming very important in the design field, the role of computers in materials design will be introduced.

  • MS414  Materials Characterization

    In this course, we will cover some of commonly used characterization techniques in materials science—what are the basic operational principles of them, what types of information can they provide, how are they practically instrumented, and how are they applied to real-world materials research.

  • MS415 Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

    Concerning present and projected needs, this course provides a strong intuitive and analytical foundation for dealing with solid state devices. Emphasis is placed on developing a fundamental understanding of the internal working of the most basic solid state device structures, such as silicon based, metal-semiconductor contact, PN junction, MOS capacitor, bipolar transistor, and MOSFET.

  • MS421 Introduction to Ceramics

    This course covers broad area of physical properties of ceramics. Topics include: crystals and crystal structure of solids, defects, interfaces, material transport, phase equilibria, sintering, thermal, mechanical, optical, and electrical properties of ceramics.

  • MS424 Circuits and Electronics for Materials Science and Engineering

    This course aims to cultivate understanding of basic properties of electric circuit elements and their interconnections, which form the basis for designing and analyzing complex electronic systems. Fundamental concepts and laws are emphasized so that students can apply them to real devices in materials science and engineering research.

  • MS425 Introduction to Biomaterials

    The objective of this course is to provide basic concepts in biochemistry, structures and properties of key biological polymers, and interactions between biomolecules with environments. This course will also introduce properties and characterization methods for various biomaterials.

  • MS431 Nano-Biomaterials

    This class introduces the systematic study of the interactions between biomolecules and synthetic materials. Topics include non-covalent biomolecular interactions, biodegradable polymers, hydrogels, biological interfaces, tissue engineering, and gene therapy.

  • MS481 Semiconductor Processing

    Basic VLSI processing technologies such as crystal growth, doping, ion implantation, thin film deposition, lithography, etching, and interconnection and also electronic packaging technologies will be studied.

  • MS482 Special Topics in Materials Science and Engineering

    This course is primarily designed to cover contemporary and advanced topics in materials science and engineering and introduces undergraduates to related novel theories and applications.

  • MS490 Research in Materials Science and Engineering

    This course is an individual research in consultation with the thesis advisor for the B.S. thesis.

  • MS495 Individual Study

    This course is an extended participation in work of a research group. This course includes independent study of literature and direct involvement in group's research.

  • MS496 Seminar

    This course is composed of weekly seminars for undergraduate students interested in materials science and engineering. Students present seminars on current topics in materials research with discussion and critic from seminar participants.

Curriculum Structure

MSE Curriculum Structure for Undergraduates
Mandatory Elective
Prerequisite
Recommended
  • 2ndYear
  • 3ndYear
  • 4ndYear
structure

Course Requirements

  • A. Graduation Credits : at least 136 credits in total (Students admitted in 2016 or later)

    ※ Students must take more than one among Intensive, Interdisciplinary, Double Major and Minor Courses except own specialty.

  • B. General Course : At least 28 credits and 9AU

    (applicable to students entering KAIST in 2014 and thereafter; for those who have entered KAIST in 2013 and before, refer to the Course Completion Requirements by Year of Admission)

Mandatory General Course
  • Students entering KAIST in 2014 and thereafter : 7 credits and 9AU

    English Presentation & Discussion(1), Advanced English Listening(1), Physical Education(4AU), Advanced English Reading(1), Advanced English Writing(1), Writing(3), Humanity/Leadership(2AU), Ethics and Safety II(1AU), Happy College Life(1AU), Exciting College Life(1AU)

  • Students entering KAIST between 2011 and 2013 : 6 credits and 9AU

    English Communication(1), Critical Thinking in English(2), Writing(3), Physical Education(4AU), Humanity/Leadership(2AU), Ethics and Safety II(1AU), Happy College Life(1AU), Exciting College Life(1AU)

  • Students entering KAIST between 2009 and 2010 : 6 credits and 9AU

    English Communication(1), Critical Thinking in English(2), Writing(3), Physical Education(4AU), Community Service(2AU), Humanity/Leadership(2AU), Ethics and Safety II(1AU)

  • Students entering KAIST between 2007 and 2008 : 7 credits and 9AU

    English Communication I(1), English Communication II(1), English Reading&Writing(2), Writing(3), Physical Education(4AU), Community Service(2AU), Humanity/Leadership(2AU), Ethics and Safety II(1AU)

    English Communication I → English Communication / English Communication II → English Conversation / English Reading&Writing → Critical Thinking in English
  • Students entering KAIST between 1998 and 2006 : 7 credits and 9AU

    English I(2), English II(2) Writing(4AU), Community Service(2AU), Humanity/Leadership(2AU), Ethics and Safety II(1AU)

    English I → English Communication / English II → Critical Thinking in English
Elective General Course in Humanities & Social Science : at least 21 credits
  • Take (6 credits) 1 course of each of the following 2 categories among 3 categories : Humanity, Society and Literature and Arts; the rest can be chosen regardless of the category. (applicable to students entering KAIST in 2009 and thereafter; for those who have entered KAIST in 2008 and before, refer to the Course Completion Requirements by Year of Admission)
  • Students entering KAIST between 2007 and 2010 should earn at least 9 credits through lectures in English among the 21 credits required as Elective General Courses in Humanities & Social Science.
  • Students having a double major take 12 credits without considering categories. (Students entering KAIST between 2007 and 2010 should take 6 credits through lectures in English.)

    ※ The requirement of taking lectures in English as Elective General Courses in Humanities & Social Science is not applied to students entering KAIST in 2011 and thereafter.

C. Completion of Basic Courses: at least 32 credits

(applicable to students entering KAIST in 2012 and thereafter; for those who have entered KAIST in 2011 and before, refer to the Course Completion Requirements by Year of Admission)

Mandatory Basic Courses : 23 credits
  • 1_ 1 course among Fundamental Physics I (3), General Physics I (3), and Advanced Physics I (3)
  • 2_ 1 course among Fundamental Physics II (3), General Physics II (3), and Advance Physics II (3)
  • 3_ 1 course of General Physics Lab I (1)
  • 4_ 1 course of Basic Biology (3) or General Biology (3)
  • 5_ 1 course of Calculus I (3) or Honor Calculus I (3)
  • 6_ 1 course of Calculus II (3) or Honor Calculus II (3)
  • 7_ 1 course among Basic Chemistry (3), General Chemistry I (3), and Advanced Chemistry (3)
  • 8_ 1 course of General Chemistry Lab I (1) or Advanced Chemistry Lab (1)
  • 9_ 1 course of Basic Programming (3) or Advanced Programming (3)

    - Students having entered KAIST in 2007 or before : 23 credits (1~9)

    - Students having entered KAIST between 2008 and 2011: 26 credits((1~9), Freshman Design Course: Introduction to Design and Communication)(3))

Elective Basic Courses: at least 9 credits
  • Students admitted before 2011 should take more than 6 credits

    ※ Students having a double major take more than 3 credits

D. Major Course : at least 42 credits
Mandatory major course : 18 credits
  • MS212 Thermodynamics of Materials, MS213 Crystallography and Diffraction, MS310 Quantum Chemistry for Materials Scientists, MS311 Phase Transformation and Microstructure Evolution, MS321 Advanced Materials LabⅠ, MS322 Advanced Materials Lab Ⅱ
Elective major course : at least 24 credits
  • E. Intensive Major Course : at least 15 credits (from Elective major course)
  • F. Interdisciplinary Major Course : at least 12 credits

    (at least 12 credits from major course of more than two departments except where you belonged.)

  • G. Minor Course : at least 18 credits

    (at least 9 credits each from mandatory and elective major course)

  • H. Double Major Course : at least 40 credits

    (at least 40 credits from major course including 18 credits in mandatory)

  • I. Elective Course
  • J. Research Course : at least 3 credits
    Students must take 3 credits for Research in Materials Science and Engineering(MS490)
    Credits from Seminar and Individual Study are counted as Research Course credits

    ※ Students having a double major are exempt.

  • K. English Proficiency Requirements upon Graduation
    Before entering or during studying at KAIST, students should obtain the minimum required score or higher from one of the following: TOEFL, TOEIC, TEPS and IELTS.
    Students who have hearing impairment level 3 or above should obtain the minimum required score or higher, excluding listening.

    1) Students who have submitted past scores for TOEIC (before April 2006) or TEPS (before February 28, 2007)

    Students admitted in 2008 or later
    Classification iBT TOFEL PBT TOFEL CBT TOPEL TOEIC TEPS IELPS
    General qualification score 83 560 220 775 690 6.5
    Qualification score for hearing impairment level 3 or above 62 372 146 387 414 4.8
    Students admitted in 2007 or earlier
    Classification iBT TOFEL PBT TOFEL CBT TOPEL TOEIC TEPS IELPS
    General qualification score 83 560 220 775 690 6.5
    Qualification score for hearing impairment level 3 or above 62 372 146 387 414 4.8

    2) Students who have submitted NEW TOEIC score taken after May 2006 or TEPS score taken after March 1, 2007

    Classification iBT TOFEL PBT TOFEL CBT TOPEL TOEIC TEPS IELPS
    General qualification score 83 560 220 775 690 6.5
    Qualification score for hearing impairment level 3 or above 62 372 146 387 414 4.8
    L. Graduation Requirements for Foreign Students: TOPIK (Test of Proficiency in Korean)
    Undergraduate foreign students are required to obtain level 2 or higher score in TOPIK before entering or during studying at KAIST.

    ※ Applies to students entering KAIST in 2013 and thereafter

Interim measures

Undergraduate Program

These course requirements Apply to students entering KAIST in 2016 and thereafter Students entering KAIST in 2015 and before should refer to the course completion requirements by Year of Admission. If you wanted, it could be applied the upper course requirements to students entering KAIST in 2015 and before.

General and basic courses in undergraduate program are different from years of admission; therefore, students should refer to the Course Completion Requirements by Year of Admission.